SUPPORTING EXCELLENCE

The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy is dedicated to integrating the domains of research, policy, and practice to achieve educational excellence for all of America’s students. The Institute is non-partisan, sector-agnostic, and evidence-based. Our work includes developing tools to evaluate curriculum and school culture, analyzing the impact of educational interventions, providing evidence-based counsel and supporting district, charter and private school networks across the country.

THE INSTITUTE PROVIDES…

  • Research and policy recommendations to national membership organizations, including Chiefs for Change, the CCSSO, the Alliance for Excellent Education, and the National Council for Private School Accreditation
  • Program evaluations, measuring the impact of high-quality materials on student learning
  • Research partnerships with several dozen state and local chiefs to support:

  • Deep and intellectually challenging curricula – through our Knowledge Maps™ in English language arts and social studies that measure content build and text quality
  • Strong school cultures – with our comprehensive School Culture 360™ – a full analysis of the conditions that we know support student success
  • Content-rich assessments

  • Highly effective instruction – our teacher survey on materials creates a full picture of what teachers know about standards, their use of curricula, and their satisfaction level with materials
  • School models that meet families’ unique needs

NEW RESOURCE ON SCHOOL CULTURE

A strong school culture, understood as the underlying ethical claims and habitual practices of a school, is linked to numerous positive academic and civic outcomes – from short-term assessment performance to long-term civic engagement and educational attainment.

The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy has designed a best-in-class survey that identifies the alignment of a school’s mission with its practices and determines whether a school’s enactment of practices correspond to those we know support academic achievement and civic formation. In elementary schools, administrators, teachers, and parents undertake the survey; in secondary schools, students also participate.

Because COVID-19 necessitated an immediate migration to at-home learning, the Institute designed a related survey for the remote-learning context.

THE SCHOOL CULTURE 360™ SURVEY EXPLORES:

SCHOOL CULTURE 360™ WEBINAR

Dr. Ashley Berner and Dr. David Steiner join Ms. Lisa French, Director of Student Engagement and Success in the Office of Academic Content at the Louisiana Department of Education, and Dr. Eric Watts, Director of Instruction and Student Achievement for the Archdiocese of Baltimore, to discuss school culture: its key components, its role in educational outcomes, and its use as an analytical framework for assessment.

THE KNOWLEDGE MAP PROJECT

Knowledge matters, and research compels us to focus on addressing the “knowledge gap” if we want to close persistent achievement gaps among American students. How do we know when a specific curriculum provides the deep content that students need?

The Knowledge Map™ tool analyzes an ELA curriculum in terms of the knowledge if offers students about the world and the human condition. We conduct this analysis by “mapping” the knowledge domains that are implicit in the selected texts – showing both strengths and omissions across the K-12 curriculum.

The Institute partners with state, district, and school leaders to analyze an ELA curriculum – and the results provide compelling, actionable data used to adopt or amend classroom materials.

Chiefs for ChangeThe Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy and our key partner Chiefs for Change created a database to curate the findings and report cross-sections of data by text, grade-level, and knowledge domain.

This resource allows new insights about the knowledge domains and topics that students are exploring in classrooms across the country.

Analysis of curriculum content by grade level

Proximity analysis shows coherence and quality of supporting materials to the anchor text.

EQUITY IN THE AGE OF COVID-19

THE RETURN: How Should Education Leaders Prepare for Reentry and Beyond?

The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy partnered with Chiefs for Change to evaluate the research on interventions that work for students in normal times and in the wake of crises such as SARS in Hong Kong or tsunamis in Japan. The result is The Return: How Should Education Leaders Prepare for Reentry and Beyond?

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While the current restrictions on student learning will not last forever, the consequences of the crisis are likely to persist well into the future. How can school systems prepare for what will be anything but business as usual?

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Listen to the podcast:

Remote Learning Resources for Teachers & Parents

Civics at Home

During this current season when children are learning at
home, parents play an even more vital role in developing democratic capacities. Not only
now, but even after the current COVID-19 crisis is past, how can parents support their
children’s preparation for citizenship?

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The Struggles of Coming of Age

Coming of age in a chaotic world is nothing new. The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy has compiled a suggested reading list (and resources to support the literature) that encapsulate what this struggle can be like under trying circumstances.

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Suddenly Homeschooling?
A Parent’s Survival Guide to Schooling During COVID-19

Two mothers, who are also certified teachers and current
education researchers, weigh in with personal tips and curated resources to make this time count for the education of your children (and maintain your sanity).

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Additional Recommended Reading

Tutoring as an Effective Strategy
in Our Troubled Times

How can leaders address transportation, social distancing, hybrid and/or staggered learning schedules, and at-risk students and teachers without losing sight of learning goals?

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When Students Go Back to School, Too Many Will Start the Year Behind. Here’s How to Catch Them Up — in Real Time

Instead of delaying access to grade-level work for students who’ve fallen behind, we need to accelerate it.

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Acceleration, Not Remediation:
Lessons From the Field

What does acceleration look like in practice? One way to answer this is to look at schools that effectively accelerate their students’ learning, every day, every year.

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Webinars and Podcasts on Equitably Reopening Schools

In April 2020, the Global Education Coalition published a series of five webinars, in collaboration with UNICEF and the World Bank, to support governments in strengthening distance learning and facilitating the reopening of schools.

VIEW THE RECORDINGS HERE

EDUCATION TALK RADIO PODCASTS

Listen: Why Knowledge and a High-Quality Curriculum Matter for Every Student

A rigorous and engaging curriculum makes all the difference in a child’s learning. Dr. David Steiner, Executive Director of the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Education Policy, former NY State Commissioner of Education, and Director of Education at The National Endowment for the Arts, discusses why we need to make that happen and what we need to do.

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Listen: School Culture – Why It Matters and How It’s Improved, Part 1

Dr. Ashley Rogers Berner is Deputy Director of The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy and Associate Professor at JHU’s School of Education, is author of “Pluralism and American Public Education.” Listen to part 1 of her interview with Larry Jacobs.

Part 2 is here.


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Listen: School Culture – Why It Matters and How It’s Improved, Part 2

Dr. Ashley Rogers Berner, Deputy Director of The Johns Hopkins Institute for Education Policy and Associate Professor at JHU’s School of Education, is author of “Pluralism and American Public Education.” Listen to this interview to learn about the Institute’s eye-opening report on school culture.

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